Tag Archives: SERPs

Scoring Brand Online Strength by Rank Weighted Search Results

10 Oct

Scoring Brand Online Strength by Rank Weighted Search Results

I first started weighting search results positions in October 2009 with a system that weighted the Top 20 results pages 20 – 1 (#1 result = 20, # 2 = 19 and so on down to #20 result = 1), for a total of 210 “points.”

RankTank's weighting system 2009 - 2012

This assigned 74% of the value of the Top 20 results (155 points out of 210) to the first 10, and 26%, (or 55 points) to the second ten, in a straight line progression.

RankTank's weighting system 2009 - 2012 weights

RankTank’s weighting system 2009 – 2012 weights

In actuality, results page values do not fall in a straight line progression but in a stepped one so in 2012 I modified the weights to the values shown in the application, which are:

RankTank's improved rank weighting system 2012

RankTank’s improved rank weighting system 2012

The new system assigns 66% of the value of the Top 20 results to the first 10, in a stepped progression that reflects how users interact with the results page in terms of a) scanning the list and b) actually clicking on results. By upping the value of the second set of ten, it also recognises their potential to move up into the first set of ten.

RankTank's improved rank weighting system 2012 position weights

RankTank’s improved rank weighting system 2012 position weights

Our business is scoring a brand’s online strength, so it’s important to score the degree to which a brand is protecting its top 10 position by blocking out the next set of ten with pages it also claims: Today’s #19 result can be tomorrow’s #9.

Scoring Brand Online Strength by Simple Count/Share

10 Oct

Scoring Brand Online Strength by Simple Search Results Ownership Count/Share

I first discovered the relationship between search engine results page (SERP) performance and company performance in 2006. The first “top brand” source I used was the Interbrand/BusinessWeek Top 100 companies survey published August 7, 2006 (http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/toc/06_32/B399606globalbrands.htm). I ran a Google search on each company (I queried the exact name, without keyword modifiers or qualifiers) and classified the Top 20 SERPs according to who claimed the results of a query for its name: the enterprise (EGM), mainstream media (MSM), consumer-generated media (CGM), or others (OGM).

In 2006, I did not rank-weight the search positions; I scored using a simple count, treating all Top 20 positions as of equal value. I changed to rank weights in 2009.

Scoring search results performance

30 Sep

It stands to reason that search results are not all worth the same value. Who looks at # 679? Or even #79? Fact is, searchers click through-to and recall the higher ranked results more than lower ranked ones. The 5th results position gets more attention – and is thus more valuable — than the 29th, so it counts for more. RankTank.eu/ is a public domain application (no cost, no license) that enables you to weight each result according to the value of its position in the search results. We use a blended consensus of industry experts’ views as to the value of these positions. We show the rank weights we assign to each of the Top 20 positions inside the application.